Archives for posts with tag: Korg MS-10


This is a follow up to the previous slinky Korg MS-10 track that i posted here.

I’m loving the Korg MS-10 for mono-synthetic mayhem.  All non drums and non pads on this track are from the Korg MS-10 and an MS-20.

:::

:::

This one comes with the perfect GIF too!

Clay Fight large Timed allfr 25

:::

Main drums are the Roland TR 909, Simmons SDS V, and Linndrum ( the low crunchy snare later ).

The Pads are Oberheim OB-8, I love the ‘THX’ sound you can get out of the mod matrix on this beast!

:::

::: IF :::

This week i am going to start an extensive series of mods on an old Korg VC 10 Vocoder.  The Korg VC 10 has a reputation for being flawed in some ways but i think it has a lot of potential despite this.  I always felt that it had an ill defined sound over all.  It lacks a clear robotic synth vibe and also employs it’s noise generator in a not always useful way.

The demo is pretty dorky and kitchy but someone posted the original korg demo for this box and i think it clearly demonstrates the design limitations i’m referring to.  It wants to sound cool but it comes across sounding mushy and muddled to me…

:::

:::

So, i did some research and found a good amount of info as to possible modifications, this first post will pertain to two major sound quality related modifications:

1,   There’s a quirk in the way the 20 sound generators are treated. Channels 17 to 20 have their carrier input connected NOT to the generator/noise/external mixer, but rather to noise only. The problem here is that this noise signal is attenuated by the generator/noise mixer, resulting in that there will be no carrier to channel 17 to 20 if you turn the generator/noise mixer knob to the generator only position! (which you may often do). Yes, the four highest channels will be quiet! Performing this mod will increase the speech recognition and add the missing edge to the sound.

2,  The bias signal for the sound generator does not affect channels 15 – 20.  By routing the bias signal to all the channels you get a brighter and more well defined vocoder output as all the channels will behave together.  This will also increase the effect of adjusting the bias.  This requires adding a few resistors that are not there for channels 15 and 16 and rerouting the 100k resistors for the remaining channels 17-20.

*** On to the dangerous part! ***

1,  The process:  Locate and release PCB KLM-134 (the filter board).  Locate the wire attached to header H3-1 (noise in).  Cut or unsolder the wire.  Now locate IC1 on the same board.  Find pin 1 and follow the trace to channel 16.  Connect from this point to the (now unconnected) corresponding point of channel 17.  The channel numbers and the traces pretty easy to locate on the PCB.  That one was easy!

2,  The process:  On KLM-134, find IC1 pin 7 (bias).  Follow this trace to R2414 (100k).  Now locate Q115 (channel 15 VCA).  Solder a 100k resistor between bias and the base of Q115 (R2315 is connected to the base).  Then locate Q116 and solder a 100k resistor between bias and the base of Q116 (R2316 is connected to the base).  Channel 17 to 20 already have the 100k resistors you need, but they are connected to ground.  Find R2417, R2418, R2419 and R2420.  Connect them to bias instead of ground.

Both of these mods sound complicated but are very easily seen in the schematic here:

:::

:::

:::

While i was inside the VC-10 i found a few other curious things that i will be discuss in a future post. I had to order more parts to do these bits!  It was filthy in there too, so i disassembled the bottom plate and did a thorough clean below the key bed.  It’s sounding way better to me with the first round of mods.  I should have done a before / after recording to reference…

To Be Continued!!

PS: These are the main sites i used for reference, technical info, and modification ideas:

Korg VC-10 Flaws & Features

Korg VC-10 Modifications

Vocoder Historical Notes

:::

It’s a Cat’s Universe, and we are merely playthings…

::: IF :::

My development is become arrested.  Space Lazr hath shaken my brain.  And the Korg wavz re Soooo Squayrwavy…..

:::

:::

This track consists of the Roland TR 909 from here and the Korg from here… Also, the Korg bloops in the breaks are triggering from a master clock.  the same clock is driving the TR 909 via R-sync and Simmons SDSV Via 96 Sequencer clock ( With MFB sequencer ) here… it’s awesome when everyone talks synth!

:::

::: ::: IF :::

Hello!

It’s tech time again, Today I’m performing an IEC power receptacle upgrade on a Korg  MS-10.  It’s a similar but easier process than the one I did for the Moog Rogue previously.  The MS series is often equated with the MS-10’s big brother the MS-20.  But the 10 has it’s perks as well.  First off, it shares a similar semi modular design which became popular in the mid 1970’s.  This allowed basic sounds to happen easily without patching but also allowed more complex routing to be patched as well.  This one has been moded slightly as you can see by the green wires that go from the mod wheel to the patch bay.  It came like this and I never felt the need to change it.  The wires connect the mod button to the patch bay in more places than it would have stock.  Secondly, the Korg MS-10 sounds HUGE.  The low frequency extension on this single oscillator synth is Awesome.  I think it’s far ‘warmer’ and ‘deeper’ than the Korg MS-20.  I always assumed this was due to the fact that it only has a LPF and not a HPF/LPF.

There’s actually a pretty extensive article about the old Korg filters here.  It even covers the newer Korg Monotron filters as well.  The MS series started in the 70’s with a proprietary chip usually referred to as the Korg35.  Later they went with a more off the shelf design that people think sounds different but not worse or better.

On to the details:

1, We aren’t adding a transformer as the step down is already inside the unit.  So the IEC will better protect you and the instrument by adding a better ground and a more physically robust power input as the hard wired power cables on instruments like this inevitably get dodgy at one end or the other.

2, We will be making a hole in the shell of the Korg.  This is always scary but it gets easier with time, and having The Nibbler helps too!

3, This Korg also has a dodgy low F# key that i want to replace.  I bought one from Synthparts. Thanks Doug!

As always: Be Careful!  120 volts is enough to hurt you!

On to the pics:

:::

I am glad that worked out!  I will be doing this with a few more instruments in the coming months…

:::

:::

::: IF :::

Hello peeps!

Here’s a new song that is complete! Activities to be accompanied by this material include, but are not limited to: driving, fishing, grilling, sports, baggo, drugs etc.

We want to be on topping you.

Nick Zampiello – Drums/Synth/Programmerification/Mixing/Additional Adding

James Towlson – Vocals/Keys/Guitar/Bridgerizer

Ed McNamara -Vocals/Lyrics/Bleep Bloops/His Guitar

Eddie Llerena – Engineer/General Helper/Clapper

Rob Gonnella – For being there…no matter when……what?